#50 – Mina Bolt Moore Thompson

Week 50 (December 10-16): Naughty

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Bert & Mina

Mina Adell Bolt Moore Thompson, my great-great grandmother, lived for years with Bert Thompson while still married to my great-great grandfather Fred Moore! She and Bert were officially married about three weeks after Fred’s death.

Mina A. Bolt and Fred L. Moore were married on September 10, 1885 in Plymouth, Michigan. They had five children between 1888 and 1897. Two daughters died before 1900. Two sons, Glenn and Earl, and another daughter, Mae, survived into adulthood. In 1900, the family was living in Plymouth and Fred was a railroad freight agent.

I’m not sure what happened to the marriage between 1900 and 1910, but in the 1910 Detroit City Directory, Mina was listed as widowed. In the 1910 Federal Census, she was listed as married and was boarding with her daughter Mae. She was listed as the housekeeper for the head of the household, Alta Fisher.

Sometime between 1910 and 1918, Mina met Bert Thompson. She was listed as his wife on his September 12, 1918 WWI Draft Registration card. And they were living at 370 Maple Ave. in Plymouth. Meanwhile, in 1919, Fred was selling grapes in Benton Harbor, Michigan.

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From the Sept. 10, 1919 Benton Harbor News-Palladium

In 1920, Bert and Mina were living as husband and wife on Columbia in Dearborn, while Fred was listed as divorced and living as a roomer with the Dean family in Benton Harbor. By March 1923, Fred was living in the Berrien County Poor Home. He died on November 4, 1924. On his death certificate, he was listed as widowed and his son Glenn was the informant.

This is odd, because Glenn’s mother Mina, was alive and well and married Bert Thompson in Toledo, Ohio on November 22, 1924. She was listed as divorced, but I’m not sure that Fred and Mina were ever legally divorced. Ancestors always keep you guessing!

bert-mina-1924

 

#49 Seneca W. Everitt

Week 49 (December 3-9): Winter

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The children of G. B. and Roseann Everitt. One of the men in this photo is Seneca W. Everitt. The only identified individuals are Mary J. Everitt Bolt (seated), Rachel Everitt Westfall (standing), and William Harrison Everitt (seated to Mary’s right).

This week, I’ll be looking at my 4th great-uncle, Seneca W. Everitt, who was born on December 26, 1838 in Portage, Ohio. He was the son of George B. Everitt and Roseann Elrick/Eldridge. He was the brother of my great-great-great grandmother, Mary J. Everitt Bolt (1837-1918). By 1850, the family, including 8 children, were living in Livonia, Michigan. Seneca was 11 years old.

In 1860, Seneca was 22 years old and was a houseman for Henry O. Hanford. Hanford, whose real estate was valued at $7,430 and personal estate was valued at $3,944 at the time, lived in Plymouth with his first wife Margaret, their son James, and his parents Jesse and Eunice. Also living in the household was a housegirl, Henriette Phelps, and two more housemen, William Rhoads and John Pool. According to Silas Farmer, Hanford owned a nearly 300-acre farm, was Township Clerk of Plymouth, Justice of the Peace of Canton, and chairman of the executive committee of the Michigan State Agricultural Society.

In 1870, Seneca was living with his parents and his youngest brother Edward in Livonia. Seneca worked on a farm and had a personal estate value of $600. On January 5, 1874, Seneca married Jennie Adams (Jane Westfall Adams) in Northville. Jennie had been previously married to William J. Adams and had three children.  Jennie was also the first cousin of the spouses of two of Seneca’s siblings. His sister Rachel had married Orson Westfall and his brother Isaac had married Orson’s sister Mary Jane Westfall.

In 1880, Seneca and Jennie lived in Plymouth and he was employed as a carpenter. In 1893 and 1905, Seneca’s property can be seen on land ownership maps on Plank Road (now Main Street) in Plymouth, next to the Markham Air Rifle Works.

In 1910, Seneca and Jane were living on South Main Street in Plymouth. In 1920, they were living at 412 Starkweather Street in Plymouth. Seneca died of senility and apoplexy on March 3, 1924 at the age of 85. He was buried in Plymouth’s Riverside Cemetery. Jane died in May 1927 at the age of 91.

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1893 map showing Seneca’s property

#48 Lucina Belknap Clark

Week 48 (November 26-December 2): Next to Last

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Lucina Belknap Clark’s tombstone in Tedrow Cemetery, Fulton Co., Ohio (photo is from 2005)

My 3rd great-aunt Lucina Ellen Belknap was the next-to-last child of Thomas Belknap and Polly Ann Farr. Thomas and Polly’s last child was my great-great grandfather, Arthur Belknap (1869-1955). There were 5 other siblings: Zera (1853-1920), Myron (1855-1929), Alice Lucelia (1857-1944), Lucretia (1860-1900), and Thomas Jefferson (1861-1935). There was also a half-brother, Francis Marion (1848-1923).

Lucina was born about 1866 in Delta, Fulton County, Ohio. In 1870, she was counted with the rest of her family in York Township. She was 4 years old. In 1880, she, along with her parents and brothers Myron and Arthur were living in Dover Township. On August 13, 1884, Lucina married John Quimby Clark in Morenci, Lenawee County, Michigan. In June 1886, Lucina’s brother Thomas married John’s sister Clara in Fulton County.

Lucina and John had 9 children: Viola (b. 1885), Bessie (1887-1920), Jesse (1890-1971), Oliver (1891-1977), Lena (1894-1981), Herbert (1898-1981), Lavada (1900-1989), Ida Fern (1902-1998), and Ione (1905-1993). Lucina died in October 1907 and, in 1910, Bessie was married, Jesse was a hired man, and many of her children were living with relatives. Herbert was living with his sister Bessie. Ida was living with Lucina’s sister Alice, and Ione was living with Lucina’s brother Zera.

By 1940, John was living with his granddaughter Florence and her family in Raisin Township, Lenawee, Michigan (Florence was the daughter of Bessie). He died in Tecumseh on January 16, 1946. He and Lucina are buried in Tedrow Cemetery in Fulton County, Ohio.

John Q. Clark with some of his children in the 1940s.

#46 Henry Oakes

52 Ancestors Week 46 (November 12-18)

Detroit House of Correction, circa 1884 (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Detroit_House_of_Correction)

Random Fact: My great-great grandfather Henry Oakes (aka Henry Oax, Heinrich Ochs, Henry Ochs) was sent to the Detroit House of Correction for 5 years for horse stealing in Wyoming Territory. He was received at the jail March 28, 1871 and was let out August 30, 1875.

I am so fortunate to be able to hear his side of the story from his 1891 deposition from his Civil War Pension File:

When I was discharged from the regular army I went as brakeman on the U.P.R.R. – ran from Laramie to Rollin Springs. Brake man a little less than a year – got my left hand [?] [?] and was in a hospital with that in Laramie City. I can’t tell how long. Went braking again on same route. I can’t say how long then the whole crew was “pulled off.” I laid(?) round Laramie I don’t know how long and I kind of think I came from there to Detroit. No I worked quite awhile at the European Hotel at Laramie City as 2nd(?) cook. Then I had charge of the dining room there quite a spell. Then to Detroit. Was brought to Detroit and put in House of Correction for 5 years for horse stealing. Had started herding cattle and was roped in. Was taking 3 horses from Laramie to Ft. Bridger for a man whose name I can’t recollect and was arrested with the horses in my possession. The man who sent me with the horses kept a [?] house at Laramie and he skipped out.

 

#44 William F. Ochs

(52 Ancestors #44 (Oct. 29-Nov. 4) – Frightening)

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Another article from the Jan. 17, 1913 St. Joseph (MI) Daily Press (this one says the children were a boy and a girl)

This post is a re-working of a post I did for a Thriller Thursday back in 2013 about my 1st cousin 3x removed, William F. Ochs. He was the nephew of my great-great grandfather Heinrich Ochs (or Henry Oakes).

William F. Ochs was born January 28, 1880 in Michigan.  He married Amelia Hartwig Hamilton on August 14, 1911.  Amelia (born 1871) had previously been married to Herman Hamilton and had 7 children with him.  Herman died in 1903.

According to a January 16, 1913 Detroit Free Press article titled ‘See Stepfather Slay Wife; Then End His Own Life,’  Amelia’s 2 youngest children, Florence and Ella were at home with their mother when William came home to their farm in Dearborn after a two-week bender.  He had a shotgun and shot Amelia in the head as she was trying to escape out the back door.  He then went out on the front porch and shot himself in the head.  The two girls ran to a neighbor who then notified the sheriff.

According to the death certificates, they both died around 8 PM on the night of January 15th  The inquest ruled it a murder/suicide.

Amelia was buried in Woodmere Cemetery in Detroit. Unfortunately, her daughter Ella died in 1924 at the age of 21 of pneumonia. Ella is buried near her sister Laura and her family, also in Woodmere.

#43 Marjorie Agnes Wilson

(52 Ancestors #43 (Oct. 22-28) –  Cause of Death)

marjorie Marjorie Agnes Wilson was my grandfather’s sister. She was born March 24, 1906 in Pittsburgh Township, Ontario. She married a widower, William Weir, on October 14, 1935 in Kingston, Ontario. My grandmother Helen Oakes Wilson was a witness. Margey died March 21, 1944 at Kingston General Hospital of “acute exfoliative dermatitis following arsenical therapy for Vincent’s angina.” According to the Merck Manual, Vincent’s Angina is also known as acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis or trench mouth. Apparently arsenic was used as a treatment, either topically or intravenously. Margey also had a terminal illness listed on her death certificate that I can’t quite make out. Sadly, it sounds like her treatment ended up killing her.

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