#8 Edward Wells Family

Week 8 (February 18-24): Family Photo

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Back row: Robert Wells, Patricia Wells Sherman, Edward Wells, Velma Belknap Wells, RuthAnn Wells Soper. Middle: Richard Wells, Donnalee Wells O’Brien, Daniel Wells, Janice Wells McEwen. Seated: Nancy Jane Clark Wells holding Cynthia Soper Reeck and Michael Wells. Photo taken in about April 1955

#6 Hazel B. Moore (1888)

Week 6 (February 4-10): Surprise

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Hazel B. Moore’s Death Registration

It’s often surprising in my research when I find that my ancestors had more children than I thought they did. One example is my great-great grandparents Fred and Mina Moore. They were married in September 1885 in Plymouth, Michigan. They had a child I didn’t know about named Hazel, who was born January 5, 1888 and died August 1, 1888 of cholera. She is listed as male in her death registration, but female in her birth registration.

 

#5 Robert Luke Wells Burial Place

Week 5 (January 29-February 4): At the Library

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Photo added by Robert Libby at https://www.findagrave.com

One discovery I made on my visit about 15 years ago to the Allen County (Ind.) Public Library was the book “Follow the periwinkle: cemetery records of Henry County, Virginia” from the Henry County Historical Society.  Robert Luke Wells, my great-grandfather, died in 1919 of typhoid fever. From “Follow the periwinkle” I discovered he was buried in Pleasant Grove Christian Church Cemetery. From there I was able to find his tombstone (although his dates of birth and death are slightly wrong).

 

#4 Margaret Rhost (1848-1939)

Week 4 (January 22-28): I’d Like to Meet

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One ancestor I’d like to meet is my great-great-great grandmother Margaret Rhost Gisel. She was born June 6, 1848 in Switzerland (or it may have been Germany at the time). Her father was Conrad Rhost and she had one full brother, named John. I have no idea who her mother was, but I believe she either died in Switzerland, on the way over, or soon after arrival because Conrad remarried to Mary Gertrude Ginder on October 9, 1855 in Fulton County, Ohio. Conrad and Mary had 8 more children.

I first found Margaret in the U.S. in the 1860 census. Conrad, Mary, John, Margaret, Mary, and Henry were living in Clinton, Fulton County, Ohio. Conrad was a farmer. John and Margaret were listed as 14 and 10 and attended school. Mary was 3 and Henry was 1.

Margaret married John Gisel in 1868. They had 9 children. Margaret and John lived in Fulton County, Ohio all their married lives. John died November 1, 1923 and Margaret lived to the age of 90. She died April 20, 1939 (11 days after her great-great grandson, my dad, was born). They were buried in Wauseon Union Cemetery.

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#3 Azariah Bost (c1830-1862)

Week 3 (January 15-21): Unusual Name

I don’t have a ton of unusual names in my family tree – the ones that are unusual are usually biblical. My great-great-great grandfather Adam Bost had four brothers: Azariah, Abraham, Michael, and Samuel.

Azariah Bost was born in about 1830, the first son of Samuel Bost and Sarah Kinder. Azariah and Hannah Long were married in April 1857 in Henry County, Ohio. Their son Joseph was born in July 1858. In 1860, the little family was living in Harrison, Henry County, Ohio. Azariah was 30, Hannah was 19, and Joseph was 2. Azariah enlisted in Company A, Ohio 68th Infantry Regiment in October 1861. on 17 Oct 1861. Azariah died of disease on March 22, 1862 and is buried in the Shiloh National Cemetery.

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Azariah Bost, Shiloh National Cemetery

According to the website Ohio Civil War Central:

“On March 15, 1862, the 68th Ohio marched to Metal Landing, Tennessee and then traveled by steamer to Pittsburg Landing, Tennessee. At this new location, the regiment’s members experienced severe illness, depleting the organization’s ranks from approximately one thousand men to 250 soldiers available for duty. The 68th did not engage Confederate forces at the Battle of Shiloh on April 6 and April 7, 1862, being ordered to stay in the rear guarding supply and ordinance trains.”

#2 William E. Oakes (1888-1928)

Week 2 (January 8-14): Challenge

The ancestor that was one of the biggest challenges for me was someone who lived relatively recently and is pretty closely related to me (great-grandfather). William E. Oakes was the first husband of Mae Moore and the father of Helen Dorothy Oakes, my grandmother. Reasons he was a challenge was that Helen was born in 1912 and her parents divorced in 1915. I’m not sure if she ever saw her father again. She never talked about him. Also, he died when he was only 40, in 1928, when my grandmother was only 16.

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William & Mae’s marriage 1908 registration from Wayne County, Michigan

The document that helped me the most and started unraveling the mystery of William Oakes was his and Mae’s marriage registration. Through that, I discovered their marriage date (Dec. 23, 1908), his age (21 and therefore an estimated birth year of 1887), and his parents names (Henry Oakes and Minnie Schroeder).

This helped me to find the Henry Oakes family in the 1900 census in Nankin Township, Wayne, Michigan. William was listed as “Willie Oak” with a birthdate of July 1888. In the 1910 census, though they were still married, William and Mae were not living with each other. She was a boarder with her mother and worked at a theatre as a ticket clerk. I haven’t found William in 1910 yet. Their daughter Helen was born June 19, 1912. William and Mae were divorced July 13, 1915. William married again on January 1, 1916 to Pearl Sullivan.

Another interesting document that tells a lot about William is his WWI Draft Registration from June 5, 1917. He and Pearl lived at 317 W. Kirby in Detroit, which would have been near the corner of W. Kirby and 3rd Avenue. His birthdate was listed as July 8, 1888. He was a foreman for Ford Motor Company. He claimed exemption from the draft due to poor health.

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I don’t have a picture of William, so this is the closest I can get to what he looked like. (from his 1917 WWI Draft Registration)

Sadly, Pearl and William had a stillborn baby boy on April 8, 1918. William died on August 31, 1928 at Receiving Hospital located at St. Antoine and Macomb in Detroit. According to The City of Detroit, Michigan, 1901-1922, volume 2, p. 1185, the Receiving Hospital was:

        “Detroit’s municipally-operated hospital located at St. Antoine and Macomb streets…and was opened October 12, 1915.
“It was established by the Poor Commission, now known as the Department of Public Wefare.
“It serves as an emergency hospital and clearing house for accident or injury cases occurring on public thoroughfares or of a public nature, and a psychopathic hospital for the safe and human handling of the mentally disturbed, and is under the control of the Welfare Commission. Other wards of the hospital are devoted to the care of medical and surgical patients unable to pay for treatment in other hospitals.”

According to William’s death certificate, he died of “Acute nephritis superimposed upon a chronic nephritis” with a contributory cause of chronic myocarditis. He was buried in Northview Cemetery in Dearborn.

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