#44 William F. Ochs

(52 Ancestors #44 (Oct. 29-Nov. 4) – Frightening)

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Another article from the Jan. 17, 1913 St. Joseph (MI) Daily Press (this one says the children were a boy and a girl)

This post is a re-working of a post I did for a Thriller Thursday back in 2013 about my 1st cousin 3x removed, William F. Ochs. He was the nephew of my great-great grandfather Heinrich Ochs (or Henry Oakes).

William F. Ochs was born January 28, 1880 in Michigan.  He married Amelia Hartwig Hamilton on August 14, 1911.  Amelia (born 1871) had previously been married to Herman Hamilton and had 7 children with him.  Herman died in 1903.

According to a January 16, 1913 Detroit Free Press article titled ‘See Stepfather Slay Wife; Then End His Own Life,’  Amelia’s 2 youngest children, Florence and Ella were at home with their mother when William came home to their farm in Dearborn after a two-week bender.  He had a shotgun and shot Amelia in the head as she was trying to escape out the back door.  He then went out on the front porch and shot himself in the head.  The two girls ran to a neighbor who then notified the sheriff.

According to the death certificates, they both died around 8 PM on the night of January 15th  The inquest ruled it a murder/suicide.

Amelia was buried in Woodmere Cemetery in Detroit. Unfortunately, her daughter Ella died in 1924 at the age of 21 of pneumonia. Ella is buried near her sister Laura and her family, also in Woodmere.

#43 Marjorie Agnes Wilson

(52 Ancestors #43 (Oct. 22-28) –  Cause of Death)

marjorie Marjorie Agnes Wilson was my grandfather’s sister. She was born March 24, 1906 in Pittsburgh Township, Ontario. She married a widower, William Weir, on October 14, 1935 in Kingston, Ontario. My grandmother Helen Oakes Wilson was a witness. Margey died March 21, 1944 at Kingston General Hospital of “acute exfoliative dermatitis following arsenical therapy for Vincent’s angina.” According to the Merck Manual, Vincent’s Angina is also known as acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis or trench mouth. Apparently arsenic was used as a treatment, either topically or intravenously. Margey also had a terminal illness listed on her death certificate that I can’t quite make out. Sadly, it sounds like her treatment ended up killing her.

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#42 Bost Boys in the Civil War

(52 Ancestors #42 (Oct. 15-21) – Conflict)

Samuel Bost (c1804-1863) and Sarah Kinder (c1809-c1845) were married on 14 June 1827 in Columbiana, Ohio. They had five sons before Sarah’s death: Azariah, Abraham, Michael, Adam (my great-great-great grandfather), and Samuel.

All 5 sons served in the Civil War.  Azariah enlisted in Company A, Ohio 68th Infantry Regiment in October 1861. He died at Shiloh on 26 March 1862 and is buried at the cemetery there.

68th Ohio Infantry Monument at Shiloh Battlefield

Abraham was in Company D of the Ohio 68th Infantry. He survived the war and died in Alabama in 1903. Michael enlisted in Company B, Ohio 38th Infantry. He died at Vining’s Station, Georgia on 15 July 1864 of a gunshot wound that fractured his femur. Adam, my 3x Great-Grandfather, was drafted into Company B, Ohio 38th Infantry Regiment on 9 Oct 1862. He survived the war and died in Ohio in 1924. Samuel enlisted in Company B, Ohio 38th Infantry on 19 Aug 1861. He died in Ohio in 1923.

#41 Gerald R. Ford

(52 Ancestors #41 (Oct. 8-14) – Sports)

Ford at the University of Michigan, 1933 (Courtesy Gerald R. Ford Library)

I don’t know much about sportsmen or women in my family tree, but I do know my 10th cousin, Gerald R. Ford played football for the University of Michigan. Ford and I are related through the Ayer family, as seen below:

Gerald Ford < Dorothy Ayer Gardner < Adele Augusta Ayer < George M. Ayer <    John V. Ayer < Samuel Ayer < Daniel Ayer < William Ayer < James Ayer < Samuel Ayer < Robert Ayer < John Ayer (Ford’s 9th great-grandfather)

K. Eklund < R. W. < V. Belknap < Earl Belknap < Arthur Belknap < Thomas Belknap < Obadiah Belknap < Nathaniel Belknap < Obadiah Belknap < Hannah Ayer < Nathaniel Ayer < John Ayer (my 9th great-grandfather)

#45 Archibald Thompson

52 Ancestors Week 45: Bearded (Nov. 5-11)
In looking through my photos on my Ancestry tree, I noticed I don’t have very many photographs of bearded ancestors. Most are clean-shaven or have mustaches.  However, I have this great image of my great-great grandfather Archibald Thompson.
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Archibald Thompson was born in either 1838 or 1841 in either Ireland or Scotland. He arrived in Canada in about 1857 and lived on Amherst Island, Ontario. He married Elizabeth Dunning in about 1860. He was a sailor, then a farmer. Archie and Elizabeth had 11 children, including my great-grandmother Mary. In the mid-1890s, the family moved to Deseronto, Hastings, Ontario. Elizabeth died in 1912 and Archibald died on 24 Feb 1931 at the age of 93 (if the DOB on his death certificate is accurate).
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Citations:
“Ontario Deaths, 1869-1937 and Overseas Deaths, 1939-1947,” database with images, FamilySearch(https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JNSZ-YHC : 8 March 2018), Archibald Thompson, 24 Feb 1931; citing Frontenac, Pittsburg, Ontario, 108, Registrar General. Archives of Ontario, Toronto; FHL microfilm 2,296,529.

#39 J.H. Wells in Horsepasture, VA

(52 Ancestors #39 – On the Farm)

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Horsepasture Store, U.S. Route 58 & State Route 687, Horse Pasture, Henry County, VA (from the Historic American Buildings Survey at the Library of Congress)

For the “On the Farm” theme, I want to talk about a farmer in my family tree and the area in which he lived and farmed. James Henry Wells, my great-great grandfather, was born in Pittsylvania County, Virginia on August 4, 1840. He married Mary Ann Clark on September 2, 1864 in Henry County, Virginia. By the 1870 Federal Census, they were living in Horsepasture, Henry County, Virginia and had 3 children. James’ sister Eliza, a widow, was also living with them with her 2 children. He was a farmer who could not read or write. In 1880, they were living in Horsepasture with 7 children and James was listed as a farmer again.

From Pat Ross and Fran Snead on the Bassett Historical Center’s “History Cornerblog from Sept. 6, 2007:

Horsepasture had no recorded name until a group of Northerners traveling South passed through this part of the county riding thin mares, undernourished and overworked. The men of this group struck bargains with the people living in the area, trading their rides for new Virginia stock – two mares for a stallion, a mare and a colt for another mare, etc.

The Yankees rode southward that Spring, but during the Fall of that same year they returned North to their homes, traveling through this very same area. The horses that they had traded were now grazing on the high quality grass of this very fertile area. The Yankees continued home, shaking their heads in disbelief as they remarked that this little area was about the best ‘horse pasture’ they had ever known. The name stuck and the local Horsepasture Christian Church was founded in 1832. There was a post office at Horsepasture from 1833 to 1906.

James’ wife Mary Ann died of a fever in 1894 and James re-married in 1898 to Sallie Lou Koger. A little over a year later, Sallie moved back to her parents and gave birth to a daughter, Maggie. Oddly, in the 1900 census, James lists his deceased wife Mary Ann as living. Sallie was living with her parents and her daughter. James farmed with two of his sons, Robert (my great-grandfather) and Edward, as his farm laborers. In 1901, James filed for divorce on the grounds of Sallie’s desertion and it was finalized in June 1903. James died March 6, 1904 and was buried in Mount Hermon Church of the Brethren Cemetery in Bassett, Henry County.

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From Find-a-Grave Memorial ID #37754107