#19 John & Anna (Ziegler) Ochs

(52 Ancestors #19 – There’s a way)

John and Anna Ochs arrived at the port of New York on April 22, 1852 on the ‘Oldenburg Gallion Hermine’ with their two young sons, Heinrich, age 4, and Conrad, age 11 months.

Passenger List from the Hermine’s Arrival on 4/22/1852

According to the New York Daily Times from that date, “The full tide of emigration has set in from Hamburg and Bremen.” On April 3, 1852, 1,500 people sailed from Hamburg alone aboard five vessels headed for New York. Before 1855, there was no central immigrant processing center. According to Rhonda R. McLure, “Before Castle Garden opened, though, immigrants were processed on the ships upon which they had arrived. Inspectors would get the passenger lists from the ship’s crew and go through them identifying the individuals” (from the article “Immigrants to Ellis Island Before 1892“). From castlegarden.org: “During this period, deceptive employers and unscrupulous money changers preyed on immigrants as they disembarked and attempted to secure work and lodging. In response, the State of New York’s Board of Emigration Commissioners established…the Emigrant Landing Depot at Castle Garden.” I hope this didn’t happen to the Ochs family!

John Ochs is next found in the 1860 census in Greenfield Township, Wayne County, Michigan (incidentally Henry Ford was born in Greenfield Township a few years later, in 1863). By this time, John was a farmer and married to Wilhelmine Mager, with two young children, John (3) and Mary (1). Heinrich (13) now went by the name Henry, and Conrad was 9. Since John and Wilhelmine’s first child was born in 1857, I presume his first wife Anna died by 1856. John and Wilhelmine had 3 more children: Minnie, Charles, and Louisa. The 1893 Wayne County Land Ownership map shows the 40 acres John owned in Dearborn.

John lived in Dearborn the rest of his life and passed away February 12, 1912 of senile decay. He is buried in Northview Cemetery. His wife Wilhelmine died in 1914.

Citations

1860 United States Federal Census. Ancestry.com. Online publication – Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2004.

New York Daily Times (1851-1857); Apr 22, 1852; ProQuest Historical Newspapers: The New York Times, front page.

“New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1891,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:275S-8FZ : 11 March 2018), Joh Ochs, 1852; citing NARA microfilm publication M237 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm.

U.S., Indexed County Land Ownership Maps, 1860-1918. Ancestry.com. Online publication – Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.

#11 – Robert Gibson

(52 Ancestors #11 – Luck of the Irish)

Yikes, I’m really behind on my 52 ancestors.  Now to play catch-up.

https://i0.wp.com/c1316757.r57.cf3.rackcdn.com/130/sllocmap.jpg

Robert Gibson, my 3rd Great-Grandfather, was born about 1805 in Ireland.  His family was from the Ards Peninsula (shown on map above) in County Down, Northern Ireland.  They likely moved to Ireland from Scotland.  According to Catharine Anne Wilson, Scotch-Irish families “emigrated from 1820 to 1860 from the United Parish of St. Andrews in Northern Ireland to Amherst Island, Ontario, Canada.” (Wilson, C. A. (1997). The Scotch-Irish and Immigrant Culture on Amherst Island, Ontario. In H. T. Blethen & C. Wood (Eds.), Ulster and North America: Transatlantic Perspectives on the Scotch-Irish (134-145). Tuscaloosa, Ala.: University of Alabama Press.)  St. Andrews was six miles north of Portaferry, from which many ships departed.

Robert married Mary McCormick in Ireland in the 1830s.  They had at least five children between 1837 and 1850, including my great-great grandmother Mary Ann.  According to her 1911 Canada Census entry, Mary Ann arrived on Amherst Island in 1857, which is when, I assume, the rest of the family came.  This also fits the emigration time frame put forth by Wilson.  She was married with a daughter by 1859 on the island.  In the 1861 and 1871 censuses, Robert and Mary were living on Amherst Island.  He was listed as Presbyterian and she was listed as Roman Catholic.  In April 1881, they were living with their son Hugh (1848-1881) and his wife Elizabeth and their two children, William and Mary Ellen.  Hugh died in June 1881 and a son, also named Hugh, was born in February 1882.

Robert died on May 5, 1882 of dyspepsia.  He might be buried in St. Bartholomew’s Cemetery on Amherst Island.  His wife Mary died on January 13, 1886 of dropsy of the heart.